70 Catholics Arrested in Capitol Hill Protest of Trump’s Immigration Policies

H1 catholics arrested capitol hill protest immigration nuns clergy sit in russell senate office asylum seekers trump policies

In Washington, D.C., Capitol Police arrested 70 Catholic nuns and clergy Thursday as they held a nonviolent sit-in protest inside the Russell Senate Office Building against the Trump administration’s inhumane treatment of immigrants and asylum seekers. More than a dozen protesters stood in a circle, holding the photographs of migrant children who have died in U.S. custody, and reciting their names. The latest protests came as immigrant communities across the U.S. have prepared for reported ICE raids that were scheduled to begin last weekend but have largely not materialized.

US ex-cardinal Theodore McCarrick defrocked over abuse claims!!

Mr McCarrick in his priest's collar, file photoMultiple allegations against Theodore McCarrick have emerged

A former Roman Catholic cardinal has been defrocked after historical sexual abuse allegations.

Theodore McCarrick is the most senior Catholic figure to be dismissed from the priesthood in modern times.

US Church officials said allegations he had sexually assaulted a teenager five decades ago were credible.

Mr McCarrick, 88, had previously resigned but said he had “no recollection” of the alleged abuse.

“No bishop, no matter how influential, is above the law of the Church,” Cardinal Daniel DiNardo, president of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops said in a statement.

“For all those McCarrick abused, I pray this judgment will be one small step, among many, toward healing.”

The alleged abuses may have taken place too long ago for criminal charges to be filed because of the statute of limitations.

Mr McCarrick was the archbishop of Washington DC from 2001 to 2006. Since his resignation last year from the College of Cardinals, he has been living in seclusion in a monastery in Kansas.

He was the first person to resign as a cardinal since 1927.

He is among hundreds of members of the clergy accused of sexually abusing children over several decades and his dismissal comes days before the Vatican hosts a summit on preventing child abuse.

The Vatican said Pope Francis had ruled Mr McCarrick’s expulsion from the clergy as definitive, and would not allow any further appeals against the decision.


‘Zero tolerance’

Martin Bashir, BBC religion editor

This is a significant moment in the Roman Catholic Church’s effort to address the tide of sex abuse scandals – not least because of the high status this former Cardinal Archbishop once held.

Not only was he the first cleric in more than 100 years to resign from the College of Cardinals, but his removal from the priesthood also confirms Pope Francis’ assertion that anyone found guilty of abuse will be treated with zero tolerance, regardless of their status within the church.

The Vatican has said that the investigative process was completed in January and Mr McCarrick was informed of the decision to dismiss him from the priesthood last night. It comes days before Pope Francis will host all the presidents of bishops conferences around the world at a summit in Rome.

The summit is designed to reflect upon the global challenge of abuse and to develop protocols and procedures that could be applied across continents.


What are the allegations?

Mr McCarrick is alleged to have assaulted the teenager while working as a priest in New York in the early 1970s. The claims were made public by the current Archbishop of New York, Cardinal Timothy Dolan.

He said an independent forensic agency had investigated the allegations. A review board, including legal experts, psychologists, parents and a priest, then found the allegations “credible and substantiated”.

At the time, Mr McCarrick said in a statement that had “no recollection of this reported abuse” and believed in his innocence.

Several more men have since said the cleric forced them to sleep with him at a beach house in New Jersey, while they studied for the priesthood as adult seminarians. One man has come forward saying he was assaulted while still a minor.

It has also since emerged that financial settlements were reached in at least two cases of alleged sexual misconduct with adults involving Mr McCarrick.

They involved “allegations of sexual misconduct with adults decades ago”, while he was working as a bishop in New Jersey, bishops in the state told US media.

“It’s your word against God’s” video testimony from three Pennsylvania victims

How does this fit into the wider sexual abuse scandal?

The dismissal of Mr McCarrick is the latest incident in a series of long-running cases of sexual abuse of children and young men by priests at the Church.

In Germany, more than 3,600 children were assaulted by priests between 1946 and 2014, a leaked report revealed in October 2018.

In the US, a Pennsylvania grand jury named more than 300 clergy in a report which found more than 1,000 children had been abused.

In June 2018, a former Vatican diplomat was sentenced to five years in prison in the Vatican for child pornography offences.

In Chile, 34 Roman Catholic bishops offered to resign in May 2018 in the wake of a child sex scandal and cover-up.

In recent weeks, Pope Francis has also admitted that priests have sexually abused nuns and in one case kept them as sex slaves.

Indigenous Peoples Day – Jacqui Voltaire

While this is about the experience in Canada this is what was happening at the same time in the US. It is important that these truths get out. I am sorry for those who do not have Facebook who cannot see the whole thing. But below that is a you tube video that is part of it you can view. Imagine both Canada and the US were out to rid both countries of all Natives and through all of that, they are still here. We can not erase the wrongs our ancestors did, but we can share the truths and call out all who were responsible then and those still doing damage in so many ways to the Native people today.  Below the videos is a hearing happening Monday feb.11th 10AM to change the name of Columbus Day to Indigenous Peoples Day for the entire state of Maine. Please share.
Love,jacqui
STOLEN CHILDREN – CATHOLIC RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL
 The State and Local Government Committee has scheduled a public hearing on this bill for 2/11 at 10 a.m.  It will be held at the Cross Building Room 214.
We need a critical mass of enlightened citizens to add Maine to the growing list of states who have made the move to add Columbus Day to the ash heap of history.
 
An Act To Change the Name of Columbus Day to Indigenous Peoples Day.
 (L.D. 179) Bill “An Act To Change the Name of Columbus Day to Indigenous Peoples Day” (HP0142) (Presented by Representative COLLINGS of Portland) (Cosponsored by Senator CARPENTER of Aroostook, Representative GALGAY RECKITT of South Portland, Representative MAXMIN of Nobleboro, Representative PERRY of Calais, Representative RYKERSON of Kittery, Representative TALBOT ROSS of Portland, Representative O’CONNOR of Berwick, Representative CARDONE of Bangor)

Please reach out to show your support for finally denying this myth continued celebration.  The time has come to honor the first people of this land. Support LD 179 Change the Name of Columbus Day to Indigenous Peoples Day

Pope Francis confirms priests’ abuse of nuns included “sexual slavery”

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Nuns have suffered and are still suffering sexual abuse at the hands of Catholic priests and bishops, and have even been held as sexual slaves, Pope Francis confirmed on Tuesday. The abuse was so severe in one case that an entire congregation of nuns was dissolved by former Pope Benedict.

The scope of the abuse of nuns by clergy members first came to light with the publication at the beginning of February of the monthly Vatican magazine “Women Church World.” The edition included Francis’ own take on the scandal — long known about by the Vatican but virtually never discussed — in which he blamed the unchecked power wielded by priests and higher clergy across the Catholic Church for such crimes.

An Associated Press journalist who first reported on the scandal last year asked Pope Francis on his flight home from the Arabian Peninsula on Tuesday whether enough was being done by the Church hierarchy to address the problem.

The pontiff conceded that it was a problem and said more action was needed. He insisted the will to confront the abuse is there, and stressed that the problem is not new, and that the Church has been working to address it for some time.

“It’s a path that we’ve been on. Pope Benedict had the courage to dissolve a female congregation which was at a certain level, because this slavery of women had entered it — slavery, even to the point of sexual slavery — on the part of clerics or the founder,” the pope conceded.

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Alessandro Gisotti, interim director of the Vatican press center, later confirmed to CBS News that the order of nuns dissolved under Benedict was the Community of St. Jean in France. The reason the order was dissolved had not previously been made public.

The Saint Jean order was dissolved in 2005, the first year Pope Benedict served as the head of the Church. He stepped down and Pope Francis took over as pontiff in 2013.

“I would like to underscore that he was a man who had the courage to do many things on this topic,” Pope Francis said of his predecessor on Tuesday.

The pope confirmed that the abuse of nuns was an ongoing problem, but said it was only in “certain congregations, predominantly new ones and in certain regions more than others.”

While the pontiff did not provide further detail on Tuesday, nuns in India and Chile, at least, have previously reported abuse at the hands of priests.

Francis told reporters on his flight that the Catholic Church,” shouldn’t be scandalized by this,” adding that “there are steps in a process,” and “we are working on it.”

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The Vatican’s new openness in discussing the abuse of nuns comes after years of revelations about clergy abusing children, mostly boys, in their congregations across the globe, and senior clergy members covering up those crimes.

On his last flight home from an international trip, just last week, Pope Francis warned that expectations for an upcoming landmark Vatican summit on clergy sexual abuse should be “deflated,” as the problem was unlikely to be resolved through it.

The pontiff’s move to lower expectations was likely a disappointment to many Catholics, particularly in the U.S. where the last year has seen a string of revelations about senior church leaders covering up abuse.

U.S. is staging an illegal coup in Venezuela

JANUARY 24, 2019
us_coup_venezuela.jpg

As President Trump announces that the U.S. will recognize opposition leader Juan Guaidó as Venezuela’s new leader and sitting President Nicolás Maduro breaks off relations with the United States, we speak with a former U.N. independent expert who says the U.S. is staging an illegal coup in the country. Alfred de Zayas, who visited Venezuela as a U.N. representative in 2017, says, “The mainstream media has been complicit in this attempted coup. … This reminds us of the run-up to the Iraq invasion of 2003.” We also speak with Miguel Tinker Salas, professor at Pomona College and author of “The Enduring Legacy: Oil, Culture, and Society in Venezuela” and “Venezuela: What Everyone Needs to Know.”

Seven priests previously at Cheverus named by Jesuits as suspected sexual abusers of minors!

Seven Jesuit priests who formerly worked at the private Cheverus High School in Portland were included on a list detailing “credible allegations” of sexual abuse of minors released Tuesday, Jan. 15.

PORTLAND, Maine — Seven Jesuit priests who formerly worked at Cheverus High School in Portland were included on a list detailing “credible allegations” of sexual abuse of minors in a list released Tuesday, Jan. 15.

The list of 50 priests who served across the U.S. Northeast was released by the Jesuit order of the Catholic Church in a show of transparency.

  • William Cahill at Cheverus from 1950-1960, deceased.
  • Stephen Dawber at Cheverus from 1978-1984, deceased.
  • Joseph Dooley at Cheverus from 1954-1958, deceased.
  • Eugene Orteneau at Cheverus from 1978-1979, deceased.
  • Richard Roos at Cheverus from 1974-78, 1979-80, admitted abuse.
  • James Talbot at Cheverus from 1980-1998, incarcerated.
  • James Walsh at Cheverus from 1970-72, 1977-79, deceased.

All but two of the priests are dead. Richard Roos and James Talbot are the only priests who are still alive. Talbot was recently convicted of abuse in September after pleading guilty to abusing a nine-year-old in Freeport in the late 90s.

RELATED: Former priest, Cheverus teacher pleads guilty to sexually abusing Maine man

Talbot had previously served six years behind bars in 2005 after being convicted in Massachusetts. Under oath, Talbot admitted to victimizing 88 children over the years.

Also named on the list was Joseph Laughlin who served at St. Ann Mission parish in Princeton from 1977 to 1982 and died in 2013.

Founded in 1917, Cheverus is a Jesuit, college-preparatory high school located in the Roman Catholic Diocese of Portland.

Officials from the Diocese of Portland released the following statement:

“The list issued by the Jesuits’ USA Northeast Province of those in their community credibly accused of past sexual abuse of minors is distressing. Though Jesuits who have served in Maine are under the authority of the Jesuits’ USA Northeast provincial, speaking for the Diocese of Portland, I hope that the release of the list provides continued healing and peace for victims/survivors everywhere. That none on the list are in active ministry offers some comfort but, as I have said, these stories of past abuse stain the reputation of the vast majority of Catholic priests who are men of great integrity. This would include the many faithful Jesuits who have served in Maine since the 1600s. Since the Diocese of Portland’s safe environment procedures were implemented in 2002, there have been no substantiated allegations of sexual abuse of a minor by a cleric in Maine, but we do not want to forget the hurt and pain this past abuse caused. The terrible harm of the past continues to give us the resolve to do all that we can to prevent such abuse from occurring again. As always, I encourage anyone who may have information about any case of sexual abuse of a minor by a Church representative to contact civil authorities and Michael Magalski, director of the Office of Professional Responsibility for the Diocese of Portland, at (207) 321-7836 or michael.magalski@portlanddiocese.org. Please join me in praying for the victims/survivors of such abuse as we ask that God keep us faithful to the path we have set to see to it that the Church is a safe place for all.”

RELATED: Former Boston priest found guilty of sexually abusing boy, victim calls him ‘pure evil’

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Pope Francis: US sex abuse scandal undermines Church’s credibility [really?!]

Pope Francis at a mass marking the World Day of Peace at the Vatican on 1 January 2019The Pope urges the US bishops to end internal bickering as they try to tackle the crisis

Pope Francis has said the credibility of the Catholic Church in the US has been severely damaged by the ongoing child sexual abuse scandal there.

Efforts to cover up the crimes had caused even greater harm, he said in a letter delivered to US bishops attending a retreat in Chicago.

He urged the bishops to end internal bickering and show unity as they tried to tackle the crisis.

The Pope’s comments on child abuse have grown stronger over time.

In an extensive letter released by the Vatican, the Pope says the “hurt caused” has generated “division and dispersion” within the ranks of US bishops.

“God’s faithful people and the Church’s mission continue to suffer greatly as a result of abuses of power and conscience and sexual abuse, and the poor way that they were handled,” he wrote, adding bishops had “concentrated more on pointing fingers than on seeking paths of reconciliation”.

“Combating the culture of abuse, the loss of credibility, the resulting bewilderment and confusion, and the discrediting of our mission urgently demands of us a renewed and decisive approach to resolving conflicts,” the Pope wrote.

Attempts to restore the institution’s credibility must be based on rebuilding trust, he added.

Next month, US bishops will join their counterparts from across the world for an extraordinary meeting at the Vatican to find ways of tackling the crisis.

A report last year by a grand jury in Pennsylvania identified more than 1,000 victims abused by hundreds of priests over seven decades in that state alone.

In July of last year, the pontiff accepted the resignation of Cardinal Theodore McCarrick, one of the US Church’s most prominent figures, following allegations he had sexually abused a teenager.

In October, Cardinal Donald Wuerl, the archbishop of Washington DC, stepped down over his handling of abuse cases.

Pope Francis called for “decisive action” when he was elected in 2013, but critics say he has not done enough to hold to account bishops who allegedly covered up abuse.

In late December, he urged priests who had offended to surrender to the law, in preparation for “divine justice”.

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