Maine: Casco’s Kate Hall wins national long jump title

STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. — Casco’s Kate Hall added another title to her trophy case, winning the women’s long jump at the 2019 Toyota USATF Indoor Championships in Staten Island, New York Saturday.

Hall won the long jump with a 6.51m leap.

RELATED: Catching up with newly hired coach Kate Hall

RELATED: Olympic hopeful Kate Hall gets personal about her diabetes

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Congratulations to Kate Hall on winning Women’s Long Jump at ! pic.twitter.com/j3ECwkF1ko

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The Casco native, who had an impressive career start while at Lake Region High School, will be forgoing her senior season at the University of Georgia to train in Maine for the 2019 World Championships and a shot at qualifying for the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo.

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High court to decide if medical marijuana covered by workers’ comp

The Maine Supreme Judicial Court will decide if state law requires Workers’ Compensation Insurance to pay for a millworker’s medical marijuana or if the insurer could be charged as an accessory in a drug deal under federal law.

Justices are set to hear arguments in the case Wednesday at the Capital Judicial Center in Augusta, which will be the first time the state’s highest court has considered the question of insurance reimbursement for the cost of medical marijuana.

The case pits a former Madawaska mill employee, injured on the job, against the company that administers the mill’s insurance for injured workers.

Gaetan Bourgoin, now 58, of Madawaska, in 2015 sought reimbursement for medical marijuana prescribed for pain due to a back injury suffered in 1989 when he was 29 and working at what is now Twin Rivers Paper Co.

Bourgoin tried a variety of opioid-based painkillers over the years without relief, according to briefs filed in Portland.

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Vetoes, bonds and late LePage surprises

The Legislature is back in Augusta on Wednesday for what’s set to be the last official day of the 2017 session.

They’re mostly back to vote on overriding 27 vetoes from Gov. Paul LePage, including bills that would set long-term solar policy, increase Maine’s tobacco-buying age to 21 and prohibit handheld cellphone use while driving.

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Trump allegedly looking into ways that he could pardon HIMSELF for his evil deeds.

Donald Trump boards Air Force OneThe US president says he has “complete power” to issue pardons

A lawyer for Donald Trump says the US president’s legal team is not looking at ways he could pardon himself.

“I don’t know where this came from. There is nothing to pardon,” Jay Sekulow said.

On Saturday, Mr Trump said he had “complete power” to issue pardons, following reports he had asked advisers about the scope of his authority.

Criminal and congressional inquiries are underway into alleged collusion between Russia and Trump’s campaign.

SHOCKER: U.S. Representative Bruce Poliquin votes in favor of tougher ozone standards

U.S. Rep. Bruce Poliquin won praise from the environmental community Tuesday when he announced his opposition to a bill that seeks to delay the implementation of stricter ozone standards.

The Ozone Standards Implementation Act of 2017, which passed 229-199 Tuesday evening with Poliquin and 10 other Republicans against it, is similar to a nearly identical measure that Poliquin and 9 other House Republicans opposed in 2016. The bill passed 234-177 in the House in 2016 but went on to fail in the Senate, where this year’s bill is now headed.

The 2017 act, which has been dubbed the Smoggy Skies Act by its opponents, would delay new ozone standards developed in 2008 and 2015 for the National Ambient Air Quality Standards and loosen review standards for a variety of air pollutants. It would also change criteria for pollution determinations from being based on protecting public health to consideration of “technological feasibility.”

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Poliquin said it goes too hard against important air quality standards.