Do you support Bernie Sanders? [YES or NO]

<> on August 14, 2015 in Clear Lake, Iowa.Following victories in early primary states, Senator Bernie Sanders is surging in polling across the country – with key states and the national averages seeing increases. Does the recent “Sanders surge” affect whether you support him?

Do you support Bernie Sanders in the Democratic primary?

YES>>

NO>>

UNSURE>>

This new pulse poll closes tonight when the debate starts, so please respond quickly!

With the current lead that Bernie Sanders has over other candidates in the race, some are calling for progressives to consolidate their support and rally behind Sanders as the nominee; but with only two states having completed their primaries, others are calling the move premature.

What do you think, Robert – should progressives unite behind Sanders or wait until more states finish their primaries?

Take the new member pulse poll today! >>

Thanks for all that you do,

— Zach, PFAW

Petition: Support Planned Parenthood

download (2)Add your name to Planned Parenthood Action Fund’s petition: I pledge to use my voice and my vote in 2020 to take back our power. >> 

SIGN NOWThe past three years have been an unrelenting attack on our

bodies, our rights, and our freedoms. From the dangerous

and illegal “gag rule” to extreme judicial nominees— we’re

seeing exactly what happens when politicians are more

concerned with attacking our rights than protecting them.

It’s hard to overstate just how monumental the 2020 election

is for protecting our rights for decades to come. And that

starts with you.

Pledge to vote in 2020 so we can make our voices heard and take back our power.

SIGN NOW
Thanks for stepping up — we can win in 2020, with your help!

Alexis McGill Johnson, Acting President
Planned Parenthood Action Fund

Supreme Court Temporarily Halts Disclosure of Trump’s Financial Records

H2 supreme court temporarily halts disclosure trump financial records

The Supreme Court has temporarily blocked a lower-court ruling that would have required President Trump’s accounting firm to release his financial records to the House Oversight and Reform Committee. The Supreme Court will now decide whether it will hear the case — which could set a major precedent about the balance of power between Congress and the executive branch.

Moveon.org: HAPPENING NOW: WE’RE AT ALL SIX OF SUSAN COLLINS’ OFFICES ACROSS MAINE

download (2)I’m Caleb, an organizer working with MoveOn on impeachment here in Maine (you may have heard from me or my colleague Bonnie last week!).

As I send you this email, right now, Mainers from Caribou to Portland are at all six of Senator Susan Collins’ Maine offices demanding that she uphold her oath of office “to support and defend the Constitution” and that she hold Trump accountable by supporting his impeachment and removal.

Sen. Collins is home this week—so she has no excuses for not meeting with us.

If you weren’t able to join us in person today, can you help by flooding her district offices with calls?

Give her a call at your closest district office: 

  • Senator Susan M. Collins
    • Augusta, ME: 207-622-8414
    • Bangor, ME: 207-945-0417
    • Biddeford, ME: 207-283-1101
    • Caribou, ME: 207-493-7873
    • Lewiston, ME: 207-784-6969
    • Portland, ME: 207-780-3575

You can say something like this: No one is above the law. Please support the impeachment inquiry in the House and vote to convict and remove Trump in the Senate. There is already overwhelming evidence of Trump’s crimes and corruption, and you need to uphold your oath to support and defend the Constitution!

Then, let us know how the call went.

Here’s why it’s so important that we keep up the pressure on Collins today:

Last week, Sen. Collins, along with Mitt Romney and other Republican senators, met with Trump at the White House—in the middle of ongoing impeachment hearings.1

Collins has used the excuse that she’s acting as a “juror” in Trump’s trial in the Senate to justify her silence on Trump’s crimes. But have you ever heard of a juror holding private meetings with a defendant?2

It’s clear that, right now, Collins isn’t planning to be an impartial juror. She’s meeting with Trump behind closed doors but, so far, has refused to meet with her constituents who support impeachment and removal. Let’s change that.

As we show up at Collins’ offices all across the state today, it’d be really helpful if you could pile on by calling in. Click here to get a number and script; then, let us know how the call went.

Thanks for all you do.

–Caleb, Bonnie, Brian, Anne, and the rest of the team and the rest of the team

P.S. Check out MoveOn’s Facebook page to watch and share a livestream of our office visit in Portland!

Prince Andrew stepping back from royal duties

Prince Andrew: Epstein ‘a constant sore in the family’

The Duke of York says he is stepping back from royal duties because the Jeffrey Epstein scandal has become a “major disruption” to the Royal Family.

Prince Andrew, 59, said he had asked the Queen for permission to withdraw for the “foreseeable future”.

He said he deeply sympathised with sex offender Epstein’s victims and everyone who “wants some form of closure”.

The duke has faced a growing backlash following a BBC interview about his friendship with the US financier.

In a statement, he said: “I continue to unequivocally regret my ill-judged association with Jeffrey Epstein.

“His suicide has left many unanswered questions, particularly for his victims, and I deeply sympathise with everyone who has been affected and wants some form of closure.

“I can only hope that, in time, they will be able to rebuild their lives.”

He added that he was “willing to help any appropriate law enforcement agency with their investigations, if required”.

BBC royal correspondent Jonny Dymond said the move was “a big step” and was “pretty much without precedent in modern times”.

He said it showed a realisation that the interview had “upset a lot of people”, adding: “It was more than just bad publicity for Prince Andrew, it was clearly damaging the wider institution of the Royal Family.”

Earlier, a letter written to the Times newspaper by Buckingham Palace cast doubt on when the duke first met Epstein.

The 2011 letter says they met in the early 1990s, not in 1999 as Prince Andrew said in his BBC interview.

The letter was published after the Times reported on the existence of a photo of the prince with 17-year-old Virginia Giuffre, then known as Roberts, who would later testify that she had been forced to have sex with him.

The duke has always denied any form of sexual contact or relationship with her.

Prince Andrew with Virginia Giuffre, and Ghislaine Maxwell standing behind, in early 2001 (said to have been taken at Maxwell’s London home)The duke was pictured with Ms Giuffre in Ghislaine Maxwell’s London home in 2001

In his interview with the BBC’s Newsnight on Saturday, the duke said he met Epstein “through his girlfriend back in 1999” – a reference to Ghislaine Maxwell, who had been a friend of Prince Andrew since she was at university.

The duke said he could not recall ever meeting Ms Giuffre and recalled that he went to Pizza Express in Woking and then returned home the night she claims they first met.

He sought to cast doubt on her testimony that he was “profusely sweating” in a nightclub, saying that a medical condition at the time meant he could not perspire.

The duke said meeting Epstein for a final time in 2010 was “the wrong decision”, but said the “opportunities I was given to learn” about business meant he did not regret the friendship.

Prince Andrew, left, and Jeffrey Epstein in New York's Central ParkThe prince said he regretted this 2010 meeting with Epstein

The duke’s website says he carries out official duties for the Queen, focusing on promoting economic growth and skilled job creation.

Over the past two months he has carried out overseas engagements in Australia, United Arab Emirates and Thailand.

BT became the latest in a series of organisations to distance themselves from Prince Andrew, following the interview.

In a statement, the firm said it had been working with iDEA – which helps people develop digital, business and employment skills – since 2017 but “our dealings have been with its executive directors not its patron, the Duke of York”.

“In light of recent developments we are reviewing our relationship with the organisation and hope that we might be able to work further with them, in the event of a change in their patronage,” a spokeswoman said.

Standard Chartered Bank and KPMG also announced they were withdrawing support for the duke’s business mentoring initiative Pitch@Palace. Sources told the BBC the decisions were made before the interview.

Four Australian universities also said they would not be continuing their involvement in Pitch@Palace Australia.

Prince Andrew cancelled a planned visit to flood-hit areas of Yorkshire on Tuesday, the Sun newspaper reported.

Prince Andrew & the Epstein Scandal: The Newsnight Interview was shown on BBC Two on 16 November 2019 and can be seen on BBC iPlayer in the UK. The full interview can also be seen on YouTube.

Prince Andrew: Standard Chartered bank cuts ties with duke’s scheme

Prince Andrew

Standard Chartered has become the second corporate partner to sever ties with the Duke of York’s business mentoring initiative, Pitch@Palace.

The bank joined accountancy firm KPMG in pulling support for the scheme.

It said it was not renewing its sponsorship for “commercial reasons”.

Several businesses and universities are reviewing their association with Prince Andrew following a BBC interview about his links to convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein.

Sources have told the BBC the decisions by Standard Chartered and KPMG were made before the interview.

‘Very serious questions’

Meanwhile, Boris Johnson and Jeremy Corbyn were asked about whether Prince Andrew was “fit for purpose” during their head-to-head debate on ITV on Tuesday evening.

The Labour leader said there were “very, very serious questions that must be answered and nobody should be above the law”.

The prime minister said: “I think all our sympathies should be, obviously, with the victims of Jeffrey Epstein and the law must certainly take its course.”

Boris Johnson says monarchy “beyond reproach”

In his Newsnight interview, broadcast on Saturday, the Queen’s third child said he still did not regret his friendship with US financier Epstein – who took his own life in August while awaiting trial on sex-trafficking charges in the US.

The interview has provoked a backlash, with businesses, charities and other institutions announcing that they were reviewing their association with the prince.

In addition to Standard Chartered and KPMG ending their support for Pitch@Palace:

  • Pharmaceuticals company AstraZeneca and Hult International Business School are reviewing their partnerships with the business scheme
  • Outward Bound, the charity the Duke of Edinburgh was patron of for 65 years, has called a board meeting to discuss the prince’s patronage
  • London Metropolitan University said it will consider the prince’s role as its patron, saying it “opposes all forms of discrimination, abuse and human trafficking”
  • University of Huddersfield students are calling for the prince to be sacked as their chancellor

On Monday, the Huddersfield students’ union panel passed a motion to lobby the prince to resign as their chancellor.

The university has since said that it listens to its students’ views and will “now be consulting with them over the coming weeks”.

Prince Andrew on Epstein: ‘There was no indication, absolutely no indication’

The duke has stood by his decision to speak out, after critics labelled the interview a “car crash”.

But speaking on the BBC’s Victoria Derbyshire programme on Tuesday, Huddersfield student Tristan Smith criticised the prince over his friendship with Epstein.

He accused Prince Andrew of “trying to dismiss” the row and failing to recognise Epstein’s victims.

Meanwhile, a woman who has accused Epstein of sexually abusing her as a 15-year-old has urged Prince Andrew to share information about his former friend.

The accuser, identified as “Jane Doe 15”, did not accuse Prince Andrew of any wrongdoing but called on him and others to come forward and give a statement under oath.

Image caption“Jane Doe 15”, left, gave a press conference with lawyer Gloria Allred

Elsewhere, former home secretary Jacqui Smith alleged that Prince Andrew made racist comments to her during a state dinner.

“I have to say the conversation left us slack-jawed with the things that he felt it was appropriate to say,” she told the LBC election podcast.

And Rohan Silva, who was an adviser to former prime minister David Cameron, also accused the prince of using a racial slur in his presence.

A Buckingham Palace spokesman strenuously denied the claims, adding that Prince Andrew “does not tolerate racism in any form”.

There is no wholesale repudiation of Prince Andrew’s public role.

But whether as a result of the interview he gave, or because of the continuing swirl of allegations, there is a falling away of support for the prince, both corporate and political.

The former Labour lord chancellor and justice secretary, Lord Falconer, told BBC Radio 4’s PM programme that he thought the time had come for Prince Andrew to step away from public duties.

Those close to Prince Andrew say that a withdrawal from public life is not under consideration.

But if support continues to seep from him, it will undermine his public position.

‘Human tragedy’

There was also further reaction to the prince’s BBC appearance.

Actress Rose McGowan – one of the most prominent figures of the #MeToo movement – told the Victoria Derbyshire programme she thought it was not a truthful interview.

“It’s also certainly not the mark of someone who is an empathetic character who cares about victims in any way,” she added.

The actress also said she wished more questions had been asked about Epstein’s alleged victims.

“We can’t forget there is human tragedy behind this… This has serious repercussions, serious ramifications and serious pain that is involved in this story.”

However, Alastair Campbell – Tony Blair’s ex-communications chief – said that although he thought the interview was a “mistake”, it was not “as bad as it is now being defined”.

Mr Campbell, who was another high-profile Briton to be named in Epstein’s 97-page “black book” of contacts, also told the Today programme that he met the financier on a visit to the US for a funeral and found him to be “a bit creepy”.

Prince Andrew’s BBC interview followed allegations by Virginia Giuffre, known at the time as Virginia Roberts, who claims the prince had sex with her on three occasions – the first when she was aged 17.

Prince Andrew “categorically” denied having had sexual contact with her.

In an extraordinary interview, which you can watch in full on BBC iPlayer in the UK or YouTube elsewhere in the world, the duke said:

  • He had investigations carried out to establish whether a photograph of him with Ms Giuffre was faked, but they were inconclusive
  • He would testify under oath if “push came to shove” and his lawyers advised him to
  • He was unaware of an arrest warrant against Epstein when he invited him to Princess Beatrice’s 18th birthday party at Windsor Castle
  • He does not regret his friendship with Epstein because of “the opportunities I was given to learn” from him about trade and business
  • Speaking out about his relationship with the financier had become almost “a mental health issue” for him

Jeffrey Epstein guards charged with falsifying records

US financier Jeffrey Epstein appears in a photograph taken for the New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services' sex offender registry on 28 March, 2017

Jeffrey Epstein was charged with sexually abusing dozens of girls

Two prison guards who were on duty on the night of disgraced financier Jeffrey Epstein’s death have been charged with falsifying records.

They are accused of failing to check in on him every 30 minutes and fabricating log entries to show they had.

Epstein hanged himself in jail in August while awaiting trial on federal sex-trafficking charges.

The charges against the two guards are the first to arise from a criminal inquiry into his death.

Epstein had pleaded not guilty to sexually abusing dozens of girls, some as young as 14.

The 66 year old was already a convicted sex offender, having been jailed in Florida in 2008 for procuring a minor for prostitution.

What are the two guards accused of?

They were supposed to check on Epstein every 30 minutes on the night of his death. He had been taken off suicide watch after a previous suspected attempt to take his own life and was alone in his cell at the Metropolitan Correctional Center in New York.

But attorney Geoffrey Berman said the two guards had “repeatedly failed to conduct mandated checks on inmates, and lied on official forms to hide their dereliction”.

The guards were named in a statement by the Southern District of New York Attorney’s Office on Tuesday as correctional officers Tova Noel and Michael Thomas, aged 31 and 41 respectively.

For “substantial portions” of their shifts, they “sat at their desk, browsed the internet, and moved around the common area”, the statement said. They then signed “false certifications” showing that they had conducted counts of inmates.

Both guards have been charged with “making false records and conspiring to make false records and to defraud the United States”.

“We allege these officers falsified records to create the appearance they were following those protocols. The security risks created by this type of behaviour are immense,” FBI assistant director William Sweeney said in the statement.

Surveillance footage showed that no other people had entered the area where Epstein was held that evening, the statement added.

Both guards were previously reported to have been working overtime shifts on the night of Epstein’s death.

US Attorney General William Barr ordered their suspension in August after the FBI opened an investigation.

Federal prosecutors later offered the guards a plea bargain but they turned it down, according to the Associated Press news agency.

Who was Jeffrey Epstein and what was he charged with?

New York-born Epstein worked as a teacher before moving into finance. Prior to the criminal cases against him, he was best known for his wealth and high-profile connections.

Jane Doe 15: “Epstein wielded great villainous power”

He was often seen socialising with the rich and powerful, including US President Donald Trump, former President Bill Clinton and the UK’s Prince Andrew.

Epstein was accused of paying girls under the age of 18 to perform sex acts at his Manhattan and Florida mansions between 2002 and 2005. He was arrested on 6 July.

He avoided similar charges in a controversial deal in 2008, pleading guilty to a lesser charge of soliciting and procuring a minor for prostitution.

Presentational grey line

You might also be interested in:

Prince Andrew on Epstein: “There was no indication, absolutely no indication”