Maine: Augusta man Robert Farrington, 27, shot by officer Sabastian Guptill is released from hospital and… arrested!

Robert Farrington, 27, received treatment for his injuries sustained Sunday when Augusta officers responded to a house on South Belfast Avenue at about 12:30 a.m., looking for Farrington.

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Inside the house, Officer Sabastian Guptill and Farrington met in what Police Chief Jared Mills described as an armed confrontation, during which Guptill shot Farrington. Mills confirmed Farrington had a gun and that one other person was at the house at the time of the shooting.

Upon his release from the hospital, the Augusta Police Department arrested Farrington for his outstanding warrant obtained by the Fairfield Police Department on the charges of assault (domestic violence) and cruelty to animals that occurred on Nov. 23 within their jurisdiction.

Farrington was also arrested on a warrant obtained by the Augusta Police Department for criminal threatening with a dangerous weapon as a result of the incident that occurred in Augusta on Sunday morning while officers were attempting to arrest him on the aforementioned warrant out of Fairfield.

Farrington’s bail has been set at $750 cash for the charges in Fairfield and $5,000 cash for the charge in Augusta, according to a press release from the police department.

Farrington also has several bail conditions in place. He was transferred to the Kennebec County Correctional Facility for holding.

Maine: Thorndike man, Eric Fitzpatrick 33, hospitalized after being shot twice by state trooper Thomas Bureau

Stephen H. McCausland, spokesman for the Maine Department of Public Safety, says Eric Fitzpatrick is being treated for two gunshots wounds after he was shot by a state trooper.

The house at 108 Ward Hill Road in Thorndike on Wednesday, a day after a Maine state trooper shot a man there during what authorities said was an armed confrontation.
BY TAYLOR ABBOTT, MORNING SENTINEL

A Thorndike man was hospitalized Tuesday night after being shot twice by a state trooper during an armed confrontation outside the man’s house, according to the Maine State Police.

Troopers were called to 108 Ward Hill Road in the Waldo County town at about 11 p.m. for a reported disturbance between Eric Fitzpatrick, 33, and his girlfriend, according to Stephen H. McCausland, spokesman for the Maine Department of Public Safety.

Fitzpatrick was shot by Trooper Thomas Bureau, a seven-year veteran of the department, according to McCausland.

Fitzpatrick was taken to Waldo County General Hospital in Belfast, and then transferred by Lifelight helicopter to Eastern Maine Medical Center in Bangor, where a hospital spokesperson Wednesday said he was in critical condition.

Bureau, who was not injured in the incident, has been placed on paid administrative leave, which is standard practice following an officer-involved shooting, McCausland said.

McCausland said he had no additional information about the incident, including what kind of weapon Fitzpatrick reportedly had and what led Bureau to shoot him.

Officials with the Waldo County Sheriff’s Office did not return calls Wednesday to answer questions about their involvement in the case.

No one appeared to be at Fitzpatrick’s house Wednesday afternoon.

Maine: Augusta police officer Sabastian Guptill involved in shooting

Officer Sabastian Guptill is on leave after nonfatally shooting a man in an altercation Sunday morning.

BY ROB WOLFE, STAFF WRITER, Portland Press Herald

An Augusta police officer on Sunday morning shot and nonfatally injured a man police say was wanted on charges from the Fairfield Police Department.

Sabastian Guptill and other officers visited a house on South Belfast Avenue in Augusta, where they found 27-year-old Robert Farrington, of Augusta.

An altercation followed in which Guptill shot Farrington, who police say was wanted on charges of domestic violence and cruelty to animals.

Guptill was not injured, and Farrington was taken to the hospital, where he is in stable condition.

“Our thoughts are with everyone involved in this heartbreaking incident,” the Augusta Police Department said in a news release Sunday.

Police did not describe what led to the shooting, saying only that “an incident involving deadly force occurred.”

The department called the incident an “armed altercation,” but did not specify whether or not Farrington was armed.

Guptill is on paid administrative leave while the Maine Attorney General’s Office investigates the shooting, as is standard for use of deadly force by police.

In the past three decades, the attorney general has looked into about 150 police shootings and determined that all were justified.

A new independent panel was created this summer to investigate incidents where police use deadly force and make policy recommendations.

 

Maine Police Shooting Reports Archive: Deadly Force

BBC: Two New York ex-policemen walk free after sex with handcuffed suspect

Former NYPD officers Eddie Martins (L) and Richard HallFormer NYPD officers Eddie Martins (L) and Richard Hall

Two former New York detectives have walked free after admitting to having sex with a handcuffed 18-year-old woman after arresting her.

Eddie Martins and Richard Hall arrested the woman for possession of marijuana before having sex with her in the back of a van in exchange for her release.

They will serve five years probation but escaped the prosecutor’s request for one to three years in prison.

The men were initially accused of rape but the charges were later dropped.

On Thursday the former police officers, both in their mid to late thirties, pleaded guilty to official misconduct and other charges linked to the incident.

The police officers pulled the woman over in September 2017 as she was driving with friends and found her to be in possession of marijuana.

They then took turns to have sex with her in the back of the police vehicle, the court heard. The police officers did not report the arrest.

Afterwards, the woman went to hospital, where tests identified DNA matching both detectives.

The rape charges were dropped because the victim’s credibility was “seriously, seriously questionable” and the charges could not be proved beyond reasonable doubt, said Justice Danny Chun.

The woman’s attorney, Michael N. David, said it was a “complete injustice” that the ex-police officers escaped a jail sentence.

A NYPD van pictured in New YorkThis New York police van has the slogan “Courtesy, Professionalism, Respect” painted on the side

As a result of the case, a loophole was closed that previously allowed New York police officers to have sex with those in custody as long as it was consensual.

Martins and Hall, who resigned from the New York police department in 2017, “engaged in a shocking abuse of power”, said Brooklyn District Attorney Eric Gonzalez, adding that he “would have preferred to see them serve prison time”.

“We could not apply the new law retroactively, and serious credibility issues in this case precluded us from proceeding on additional charges,” said Mr Gonzalez, “yet we remained committed to holding these defendants accountable”.

Mohamed Noor, US policeman guilty of Australian Justine Damond’s murder

Mohamed Noor pictured in two police mugshotsMohamed Noor was taken into custody upon his conviction

A former policeman in the US state of Minnesota has been found guilty of murdering an unarmed Australian woman.

Mohamed Noor shot Justine Ruszczyk Damond as she approached his patrol car to report a possible rape behind her Minneapolis home on 15 July 2017.

Noor, 33, testified last week that he opened fire because he feared he and his partner were being ambushed.

Ms Damond, 40, a yoga instructor from Sydney, was engaged and was due to marry a month after the shooting.

The death drew international criticism and Australia’s prime minister at the time, Malcolm Turnbull, said it was “inexplicable”.

Noor was handcuffed and taken into custody immediately upon being convicted by a jury on Tuesday of third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter.

He was acquitted of the most serious charge of second-degree murder with intent to kill.

Australian woman Justine DamondJustine Damond

The trial heard the victim, a dual US-Australian citizen, lay dying from a gunshot wound just over a minute after ending a phone conversation with her fiance.

She had told Don Damond that police had just arrived after she called them to report a possible sexual assault in the alley behind their home. No such attack was ever found to have occurred.

Noor took the stand last week to say he recalled seeing a blonde female in a pink T-shirt approach his squad car on the night of the shooting.

He said he believed there was an imminent threat after he heard a loud bang and saw Ms Damond with her right arm raised.

Noor said his partner, Officer Matthew Harrity, shouted “Oh Jesus!” and fumbled with his gun in its holster before “he turned to me with fear in his eyes”.

The defendant said he “had to make a split-second decision” and shot Ms Damond across his partner through the car window.

Justine Damond’s family hold a silent vigil at a beach in Sydney last year

Noor told the court that upon realising he had shot an unarmed woman he “felt like my whole world came crashing down”.

Prosecutors questioned whether the loud bang was real, pointing out that neither Noor nor his partner initially mentioned anything at the scene about hearing such a noise.

Ms Damond’s fingerprints were not found on the squad car, the court heard.

She had moved to the Midwestern city to marry her boyfriend, Don Damond, and had adopted his surname ahead of their nuptials.

Mr Damond was in Las Vegas, Nevada, when investigators called him to say she was dead.

Former Minneapolis police officer Mohamed Noor in court on 2 AprilNoor joined the police force in 2015

He told the court he learned from a second phone call that she had been shot by a police officer.

Mr Damond said contacting her family in Australia to tell them the news was the “worst phone call” he ever had to make.

Noor is a former Somalian refugee whose family moved to the US and settled in Minneapolis.

He joined the police force in 2015, but was sacked after being charged in the shooting.

The fallout also cost Minneapolis Police Chief Janeé Harteau her job and was a factor in the election defeat of the city’s mayor a few months later.

The Damond family have filed a civil lawsuit against the city and several police officers seeking $50m (£38m) in damages.

Minneapolis Police Chief Medaria Arradondo apologised to Damond’s friends and family in a statement released after Tuesday’s verdict was read.

“This was indeed a sad and tragic incident that has affected family, friends, neighbours, the City of Minneapolis and people around the world, most significantly in her home country of Australia,” he said.

Aljazeera: US police brutality videos emerge showing unnecessary force

Police brutality continues to make African American community feel marginalised.

Relations between police and the African American community in the United States have flared up again after controversial new videos emerged appearing to show officers using unnecessary force.

 

2018 saw most killings linked to US far right since 1995: ADL

Watchdog says 2018 saw most far-right-linked killings since 1995, with 42 of 50 murders carried out by firearm.

People protesting against US President Donald Trump wait near the Tree of Life Congregation in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. [Brendan Smialowski/AFP]

People protesting against US President Donald Trump wait near the Tree of Life Congregation in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. [Brendan Smialowski/AFP]

From a deadly ambush on a Pittsburgh synagogue that killed 11 to a Parkland, Florida school shooting that left 17 dead, every US “extremism-related murder” in 2018 was linked to the far right,according to a new report by the Anti-Defamation League (ADL).

Last year marked the most killings by far-right attackers since 1995, with 42 of 50 murders carried out with firearms, an annual report published by the ADL concluded.

The report adds that 2018 was the fourth-deadliest year on record since the ADL started tracking such murders in 1970.

“The white supremacist attack in Pittsburgh should serve as a wake-up call to everyone about the deadly consequences of hateful rhetoric,” said Jonathan Greenblatt, the ADL’s CEO, in a statement.

“It’s time for our nation’s leaders to appropriately recognise the severity of the threat and to devote the necessary resources to address the scourge of right-wing extremism.”

Hate before the vote: Pipe bombs, shootings, incitement

The ADL partly attributes the comparably high number of deaths to a series of mass shootings, including 17 incidents involving “shooting sprees that caused 38 deaths and injured 33 people”.

One of the perpetrators, 17-year-old Corey Johnson of Florida, had switched from white supremacism and “allegedly converted to Islam” prior to stabbing several people during a sleepover, killing a 13-year-old and injuring two others.

A demonstrator waits for the start of a protest in the aftermath of the mass shooting at the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh [Matt Rourke/AP Photo]

Unlike previous years, the ADL included a new category of political motivation known as the incel (or “involuntary celibacy”) movement.

The incel movement is a predominantly white online subculture populated by men who blame women for their failure to find sexual or romantic partners.

In November 2018, Scott Paul Beierle opened fire on a yoga studio in Tallahassee, Florida, killing 61-year-old Nancy Van Vessem and 21-year-old Maura Binkley. Four others were injured; Beierle killed himself.

Media reports later found that Beierle had posted several YouTube videos in which “he revealed deep-seated hatred towards women, particularly women in interracial relationships who had ostensibly betrayed their ‘blood'”, the report says.

Hate crimes on the rise

In California’s Orange County on January 2, 2018, Samuel Woodward, a member of the neo-Nazi group Atomwaffen Division, stabbed to death Blaze Bernstein, a former classmate of Woodward’s who was gay and Jewish. Woodward was charged with first-degree murder with hate crime enhancement.

In February 2018, Nikolas Cruz shot up his former high school in Parkland, Florida, killing 17 and wounding 17 more.

In October 2018, white nationalist Robert Bowers allegedly stormed a Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania synagogue and shot dead 11 worshipers. Authorities charged him with 44 counts, including religious hate crimes.

The youngest victim was 53 years old and the oldest was 97.

Barry Werber, a 76-year-old survivor of that attack, later told the Associated Press, “I don’t know why he thinks the Jews are responsible for all the ills in the world, but he’s not the first and he won’t be the last.”

Anti-Muslim campaigning in the US is a ‘losing strategy’: report

Werber added, “Unfortunately, that’s our burden to bear. It breaks my heart.”

In the wake of the massacre, critics accused US President Donald Trump of stoking hatred and inciting against minorities, a charged Trump rejected.

Writing on Twitter after visiting the community in the wake of the incident, Trump dismissed the criticism and claimed his office was “shown great respect on a very sad and solemn day” in Pittsburgh.

The FBI reported a 17-percent rise in hate crimes in 2017, the largest increase in more than a decade.

 

SOURCE: AL JAZEERA AND NEWS AGENCIES