Green Party: Lisa Savage for US Senate

Lisa for Maine

Dear Friends —

A whole lot has been going on with Lisa Savage’s campaign for U.S. Senate. We wanted to update you on some of our recent highlights!

No CMP Corridor/NECEC Press Conference Thu 12/5 in Lewiston [Arrive at 2:30PM if you can for Lisa’s 3PM Press Conference]

Lisa stands with Mainers against the CMP Corridor/NECEC! Join Lisa, 2016 Green Presidential candidate Dr. Jill Stein, Penobscot journalist Dawn Neptune Adams, and former Maine Green Governor candidate Jonathan Carter at the public hearing in Lewiston on Thursday, December 5th to let everyone know why the CMP Corridor/NECEC is a bad deal for Maine (see our recent statement here).

Please RSVP on our website to let us know you’ll be standing with us to keep corporate hands off our Maine woods!
Click here to see the event on Facebook and invite friends.

Friday December 6th 5PM Come Meet Lisa Savage in Congress Square Park [on the corner of High and Congress St. in Portland] Where she will be tabling the First Friday Art Walk

Campaign School in Portland Sat 12/7

There will be a Green Party Campaign School in Portland this Saturday December 7th. If you’re interested in running for office or helping out on a campaign team, this training is for you. Lisa Savage and many of her team members will be there – hope you can join us!

Click here for more info on the Green Campaign School in Portland this Saturday.

 

Lisa: As Senator, I’ll stand up to neo-McCarthyism, say no to U.S. wars

Have you noticed lately that people who reject endless war tend to get labeled as “Russian assets”? Lisa recently wrote an op-ed in the Portland Press Herald taking on this new McCarthyism and promising that as a U.S. Senator, she’ll say no to endless wars no matter what they call her..

Read Lisa’s op-ed here and share it on Facebook and Twitter.

Help put Lisa on the ballot – take our signature pledge!

To get Lisa on the ballot, we need to gather 2,000 valid signatures from registered voters with the Maine Green Independent Party between January 1st and March 15th. You can help our grassroots campaign meet this challenge by pledging your signature now to our upcoming petition drive, and sharing our signature pledge with your friends, family and neighbors.

Add your name to the Lisa for Maine signature pledge now!

Exploratory no more – we’re in it to win it!

Less than a month after launching Lisa’s exploratory campaign for U.S. Senate, we decided to end the exploratory phase and make this campaign official. The overwhelming and enthusiastic response throughout Maine has made it clear people are eager for a people-powered alternative to Susan Collins.

We knew this campaign was going places when we passed the fundraising threshold to file with the FEC within the first week. Already, scores of people have volunteered to phonebank for Lisa as we prepare to tackle our first challenge of getting on the ballot.

We’ve also made 3 new hires onto our team: Communications Director Dave Schwab, a veteran of past presidential campaigns that have transformed the political landscape with bold ideas like the Green New Deal; Ballot Access Manager Isaac Schattenburg, who played a key role powering Ranked Choice Voting onto the Maine ballot; and Campaign Administrator Erin Fox, an expert in data and system infrastructure.

In addition, renewable energy expert David Gibson has ended his campaign for the MGIP U.S. Senate nomination and joined the Savage campaign as a renewable energy policy advisor, and Maine activist Bruce Gagnon is taking a three-month unpaid leave of absence so he can work full-time for the campaign on tasks like scheduling, volunteer coordination, and collecting signatures.

We’re thrilled to be building such a talented team to elect a Senator who will work for the people, not the powerful!

Our campaign needs YOU

Lisa for Maine has been a people-powered campaign from the start, driven by folks like you who are hungry for a better world. We’re off to a great start, but to really make Lisa a contender, we need your help!

We especially need volunteers who can help with phonebanking, which we’ve started in earnest to call registered Maine Green Independent voters to ask them to take our signature pledge. You can help with phonebanking from wherever you live.

Sign up to volunteer today!

As a campaign that proudly refuses money from corporate interests, we need your donations to keep going strong. We’re gearing up for our drive to put Lisa on the ballot, and collecting 2,000 signatures from registered Greens in Maine is no small feat.

Pitch in what you can today!

Thank you for all you do to help elect a Senator for people, planet and peace!

-The Lisa for Maine Team


Lisa for Maine
http://www.lisaformaine.org/

Lisa for Maine · PO Box 1887, Gray, ME 04039, United States

Senator Susan Collins, Romney join Trump for lunch amid impeachment inquiry

U.S. Sen. Susan Collins, who has not commented on the House impeachment inquiry, said it did come up at a meeting between Trump and GOP senators Thursday, but the discussion was brief.

vlcsnap-2019-11-10-20h56m02s177

U.S. Sen. Susan Collins and other Republican senators joined President Trump for lunch Thursday to talk about a “wide range of issues” including an ongoing impeachment inquiry.

The meeting is the latest in a series of Thursday lunches the president has called with Republican senators who could decide his fate if the current House inquiry leads to a Senate impeachment trial.

Collins, a Maine Republican who is up for re-election in 2020, has yet to comment publicly on impeachment and has cited her role as a potential “juror” in a Senate trial as grounds for not commenting on the House proceedings.

In an email Thursday afternoon, a spokeswoman for Collins said she made the following comment when asked about impeachment after the lunch: “I’m not going to get into the details of what the President said, but he made a few brief comments at the beginning. He did not ask anything of anyone. There was no procedure discussed.”

Politico reported Thursday that impeachment has been a frequent topic of discussion during recent lunch meetings between Trump and small groups of Republican senators.

Also attending Thursday’s lunch was Utah Sen. Mitt Romney, who along with Collins and Sen. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska are the only Senate Republicans to not sign a GOP resolution denouncing House Democrats’ impeachment inquiry.

“Today’s lunch was one in a long series of Thursday lunches with Republican senators that have been going on for many weeks in Washington,” Collins said in a statement.

She said discussion at the meeting included a “wide range of issues,” such as legislation to address the high cost of prescription drugs, potential FDA regulations on vaping and e-cigarettes and government funding of bills.

“During the meeting, both (Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa) and I urged the president to support a number of bills we’ve written that would help lower the skyrocketing cost of prescription drugs,” Collins said. “I also brought up the unjustified increases in the cost of insulin, which was first isolated nearly a century ago.”

News of Collins’ lunch with the president Thursday drew criticism from Maine Democrats and others who pressed for more details on her thoughts on impeachment.

The Maine Democratic Party in a written statement said Collins should answer questions, including, “Is it appropriate for a juror to dine with a potential defendant prior to a proceeding?”

Mainers for Accountable Leadership, a liberal group pushing for transparent and accountable congressional leadership, also criticized Collins for not talking about the impeachment inquiry.

“Senator Collins says she can’t ‘comment’ to the public about the impeachment inquiry or face constituents like me in a town hall to discuss the president’s quid pro quo, but she will have lunch with the defendant,” said Marie Follayttar, co-director of Mainers for Accountable Leadership, in a statement.

“She serves the people, but continues to fall in line with Trump and the party leaders,” Follayttar said.

The impeachment inquiry is in its fifth day of public hearings. It centers on whether Trump pressured the Ukrainian government to investigate the role of Joe Biden’s son, Hunter Biden, on the board of a Ukrainian energy company while his father was vice president, withheld foreign aid over the matter and then covered it up.

If the inquiry leads to a House decision to impeach the president, the next step would be a trial in the Senate, where the vote of two-thirds of senators would be needed to remove the president from office.

After Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi called for a vote on an impeachment inquiry in September, Collins cited her role as a potential juror as grounds for not commenting on the inquiry.

“The constitutional role of a senator during an impeachment trial includes serving as a juror,” she said at the time. “As such, at this point, it is not appropriate for a senator to comment on the merits of the House inquiry or to prejudge its outcome. Therefore, I will not be commenting on the House proceedings.”

At a memorial service for firefighters last month, however, Collins said it was “completely inappropriate” for a president to encourage a foreign state to investigate a political rival. Those comments came in response to a question about Trump saying China should also investigate Biden and his son.

According to the report in Politico, other senators at Thursday’s lunch, in addition to Collins, Grassley and Romney, were James Lankford of Oklahoma; Rand Paul of Kentucky; John Hoeven of North Dakota; and Shelley Moore Capito of West Virginia.

Romney, who recently clashed with Trump publicly, resulting in the president calling him a “pompous ass” on Twitter, told The Hill after the lunch that the meeting was “delightful.”

“It was a very delightful meeting with the president and vice president and senior members of his staff and several Republican senators,” Romney said. “We were able to talk about vaping and considered various options, and each of us spoke about our thoughts in that regard.”

Trump may be Maine Sen. Susan Collins’ biggest re-election hurdle

Add in the impeachment inquiry, and the Republican has more to worry about than just her Democratic challengers

vlcsnap-2019-11-10-20h56m02s177

 

Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, hands out candy to children outside her office during an Oct. 25 trick-or-treat event hosted by the local chamber of commerce in Lewiston. Associated Press/David Sharp

Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, hands out candy to children outside her office during an Oct. 25 trick-or-treat event hosted by the local chamber of commerce in Lewiston.

LEWISTON — Republican Sen. Susan Collins has a well-funded Democrat prepping to challenge her next year. She has national women’s groups ready to attack her over her vote for Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh. And she’s a moderate facing an electorate that increasingly prioritizes purity.

Still, the four-term Maine senator’s biggest hurdle to re-election may be the president of her own party.

President Trump’s potential impeachment in the House and subsequent trial in the Senate presents a distinct dilemma for Collins. Of the handful of Republicans senators facing re-election next year, she has done perhaps the most to keep a clear distance from Trump. But as Democrats charge ahead toward impeachment, it looks increasingly likely that Collins will be forced to take sides in dramatic fashion. The senator, who has acknowledged she didn’t vote for the president in 2016 and still won’t say whether she will next year, may have to vote for him on the Senate floor.

“Susan Collins is in a terrible position,” said David Farmer, a Democratic operative in Maine. “The position that she’s in where she will likely … take a vote on whether to remove the president from office is going to inflame either the Democratic or the Republican base.”

Collins has kept mum on the House inquiry into whether the president abused his power by trying to get the president of Ukraine to investigate Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden and his son Hunter because of her potential role as an impeachment juror.

But she’s already shown a willingness to criticize the president on various issues. She said it was “completely inappropriate” for Trump to ask China to investigate the Bidens. And she said his decision to pull U.S. troops from the border in Syria and leave Kurds open to attack was “terribly unwise.”

Trump often lashes out at those who criticize him, even those in his own party, like Sens. Mitt Romney of Utah and Ben Sasse of Nebraska.

But he has not attacked Collins, yet.

Collins’ aides shrug off questions of how presidential politics could factor into her race, and the 66-year-old senator said she’s built her career on an independence valued by Mainers.

“I just have to run, should I decide to run, my own race. And that’s what I’ve always done regardless of who’s on the top of the ticket,” she told The Associated Press.

She has said she plans to formally announce whether she’s seeking re-election later this fall.

The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee has thrown its support behind Maine House Speaker Sara Gideon. The three other Democratic candidates are activist Betsy Sweet, attorney Bre Kidman and a late-comer, former Google executive Ross LaJeunesse.

For her part, Gideon has been touting her progressive credentials in her fundraising, but she’s stopped shy of supporting Medicare for All or the Green New Deal, though she says climate change and universal health care are important to her.

She’s unequivocal on Trump.

She supports the Democratic-led impeachment inquiry – and accuses Collins of failing to stand up to Trump. “In the times that we’ve needed her the most, since (Trump) has become president, she’s not delivering for us,” Gideon told a gathering in Portland.

Gideon raised $1 million more than Collins in the most recent reporting cycle. But Collins has raised far more money – $8.6 million – the largest of any political candidate in Maine history. Pundits suggest upward of $80 million to $100 million could be spent on this race before Election Day 2020.

Democrats see an opportunity as Collins navigates a potentially precarious path in a fractured state where Trump is reviled in liberal, coastal communities and cheered in the conservative, heavily wooded north.

Try as she might, she won’t be able to avoid Trump, who’s expected to campaign in Maine, where he claimed one of the state’s four electoral votes in 2016.

Josh Tardy, a Bangor attorney and former Republican leader in the Maine House, said Mainers expect Collins to demonstrate “due diligence” on her constitutionally imposed obligations when it comes to impeachment.

But he downplayed the impact in her race.

“I think most people view this impeachment as partisan tit for tat. I don’t think that’s (going) to drive the election needle one way or the other,” he said.

In Lewiston, a former mill town on the Androscoggin River, the senator’s challenges were clear even at a recent event hosted by the local chamber of commerce.

Collins appeared at ease as she handed out Halloween candy to children, posed for selfies and chatted with the adults. But some voters were less so.

Hillary Dow said she was “troubled” by a key vote that incensed Democrats – Collins’ support of Kavanaugh, who was accused of sexual assault during the Supreme Court confirmation process. But she said she continues to back Collins because of the bigger picture – her moderate views, her bipartisanship, her track record.

“I appreciate that she’s honest and fair, and she focuses on what really matters. She’s a good person,” she said.

But one man who sought out Collins for a photo later acknowledged he might not vote at all because he’s so frustrated with national politics.

“I’m not sure if I trust anyone anymore, as far as the politicians go,” said restaurant worker Craig Aleo. “It’s a tough world right now.”

Collins conceded it’s a difficult time for a politician who has made a career trying to broker legislative deals.

“The current environment is very disturbing to me. There’s a lack of focus on what we need to do for the American people, and instead the focus is on power struggles over who’s going to control what,” she said.

Collins hails from Caribou, in the conservative 2nd Congressional District that voted for Trump. That’s where her parents served as mayor, and where her family still runs the S.W. Collins hardware store.

Ousting Collins from Maine politics, where her roots run deep, is no small task.

Cynthia Noyes, who describes herself as “liberal in Republican clothing,” fears that her friend from high school is more vulnerable this election cycle. But the Caribou flower shop owner still supports Collins, and she hopes other independent-minded voters will support her as they have in the past.

“Do what’s right and you’ll be OK. Mainers are like that. If they think you’re doing the right thing, then you’ll be OK,” she said.

Maine Moveon Survey: Who should we support to replace Susan Collins?

MoveOn Member Survey

Free Speech for People: Reclaim the Court

The Supreme Court is facing a crisis of legitimacy. In the wake of Brett Kavanaugh’s hasty confirmation last year, Americans are on edge as the Court rules on issues that radically impact our lives.

Brett Kavanaugh may have been confirmed to the Supreme Court, but the fight isn’t over. We’re asking House members to investigate his fitness for office since the Senate failed to do so. Because no matter how entitled Kavanaugh thinks he is, that seat belongs to us – the people. Join Women’s March, Demand Justice, and Center for Popular Democracy on the anniversary of his confirmation, October 6th, to Reclaim the Court.

RECLAIM THE COURT

Sunday, October 6th at 12:30 PM ET

Columbus Circle

Free Speech For People has repeatedly called for Kavanaugh’s impeachment on the basis of perjury, credible sexual assault allegations, and actions during his confirmation process which brought the judiciary into disrepute. Today, we renew that call and we are proud to join with our allies in demanding that the House of Representatives open this investigation.

A thorough vetting of Brett Kavanaugh and his actions is more important now than ever. The House has a constitutional duty to conduct this investigation and to finish the work that the Senate failed to complete last year. But they need to act now.

RSVP at www.ReclaimTheCourt.com and Facebook. Let’s do this.

In solidarity,

Free Speech For People

“Help defeat Senator Susan Collins!”- Moveon.org

Last year, Senator Susan Collins cast the deciding vote to give Brett Kavanaugh a lifetime appointment to the U.S. Supreme Court.1

Not only did she vote for Kavanaugh, but she delivered a 43-minute Senate floor speech in support of his confirmation, disregarding the harrowing testimony from Dr. Christine Blasey Ford.2 That act did enough damage to women’s rights to more than undo everything Collins has done for women during her two-decade career in the U.S. Senate.

Now, according to the nonpartisan Cook Political Report, Collins is in real trouble, and we have a clear chance at defeating her. Her Senate seat—which is one of only two Senate seats currently filled by a Republican in a state won by Hillary Clinton in 2016—just moved to the “toss-up” category from “lean Republican.”3

Will you chip in $5 a month to support MoveOn’s campaign to defeat Susan Collins, end GOP control of the Senate, and defeat Donald Trump in 2020?

Yes, I’m in! I’ll chip in monthly.

No, I’m sorry, I can’t make a monthly donation.

For years, Maine voters thought that Collins stood with women and was a defender of Roe v. Wade. But now:

They are facing the hard reality that Collins chose to vote for a sexual predator hell-bent on taking rights away from women.

They are facing the hard reality that she chose to value the career advancement of a predator over the experiences and traumas of the women he victimized.

They are facing the hard reality that she sided with Trump and Mitch McConnell over the needs of millions of women, in her words and deeds, again and again, in recent years.

And they are facing the hard reality that while Collins sometimes speaks like a moderate, she acts like a right-wing extremist when it comes to her votes to further the Trump-McConnell agenda. (Often, when Trump does something repugnant, she rushes in front of TV cameras to say how concerned and disappointed she is. She’s done it so many times that it’s become a joke on Saturday Night Live. But the reality is that under Trump her voting record became MORE partisan, setting a new personal record for the most party-line votes in her entire career.)4

Not only can we defeat Collins, but her seat is critical in our fight to end Republican control of the Senate. But to defeat Collins, we need to spread the word about her record. MoveOn has a long history in the state of Maine, and that’s our secret weapon: an army of MoveOn members who can knock on doors, host house parties, fill phone banks . . . Whatever it takes to get out the vote and win.

Will you chip in $5 a month to support MoveOn’s campaign to defeat Susan Collins, end GOP control of the Senate, and defeat Donald Trump in 2020?

Yes, I’ll chip in monthly.

No, I’m sorry, I can’t make a monthly donation.

The majority of Maine voters are independents—”unenrolled” with any particular political party.5 For years, Collins convinced independents that she was one of them.

But now the truth will come out—if we can raise the funds to spread the truth. With your help, we’ll make sure Maine voters know that Collins:

  • Cast the deciding vote to nominate Kavanaugh, paving the way to end Roe.6
  • Raised more money from Kavanaugh supporters than Mainers.7
  • Voted for Trump’s $1.5 trillion tax scam.8

Polls show that Collins is increasingly unpopular and that we can defeat her and end GOP control of the Senate. But only if we get going now. Which is why we’re asking:

Will you chip in $5 a month to support MoveOn’s campaign to defeat Susan Collins, end GOP control of the Senate, and defeat Donald Trump in 2020?

Yes, I’m in! I’ll chip in monthly.

No, I’m sorry, I can’t make a monthly donation.

Thanks for all you do.

–Allison, Seth, Karine, Schuyler, and the rest of the team

Sources:

1. “Susan Collins Announces Deciding Vote: ‘I Will Vote To Confirm Judge Kavanaugh,'” HuffPost, accessed August 22, 2019
https://act.moveon.org/go/85433?t=8&akid=243771%2E41173931%2EfaSIH_

2. “Watch Sen. Collins’s full speech on Kavanaugh vote,” The Washington Post, accessed August 22, 2019
https://act.moveon.org/go/85435?t=10&akid=243771%2E41173931%2EfaSIH_

3. “Cook Political Report moves Susan Collins Senate race to ‘toss up,'” The Hill, August 16, 2019
https://act.moveon.org/go/85437?t=12&akid=243771%2E41173931%2EfaSIH_

4. “Susan Collins was a more reliable vote for GOP in 2017 than any other year,” CNN, July 11, 2018
https://act.moveon.org/go/83872?t=14&akid=243771%2E41173931%2EfaSIH_

5. “Registered voters in Maine by town and party,” Portland Press Herald, accessed August 22, 2019
https://act.moveon.org/go/85438?t=16&akid=243771%2E41173931%2EfaSIH_

6. “Susan Collins Announces Deciding Vote: ‘I Will Vote To Confirm Judge Kavanaugh,'” HuffPost, accessed August 22, 2019
https://act.moveon.org/go/85433?t=18&akid=243771%2E41173931%2EfaSIH_

7. “Susan Collins Raised More Money From Brett Kavanaugh Supporters Than Mainers,” HuffPost, February 6, 2019
https://act.moveon.org/go/85439?t=20&akid=243771%2E41173931%2EfaSIH_

8. “Susan Collins’ opponents are hitting her on the GOP tax plan. Here’s what it did.,” Bangor Daily News, August 21, 2019
https://act.moveon.org/go/85440?t=22&akid=243771%2E41173931%2EfaSIH_

Want to support our work? The MoveOn community will work every moment, day by day and year by year, to resist Trump’s agenda, contain the damage, defeat hate with love, and begin the process of swinging the nation’s pendulum back toward sanity, decency, and the kind of future that we must never give up on. And to do it we need your ongoing support, now more than ever. Will you stand with us?

Yes, I’ll chip in $5 a month.

No, I’m sorry, I can’t make a monthly donation.


Senator Collins to Husson grads: ‘hyper-partisanship, insult, and accusation are poisoning our discourse’

Senator Collins issued two challenges to Husson University grads: stay in Maine, and restore civility and union to the country.
download (24)

BANGOR, Maine — Senator Susan Collins delivered the commencement address at Husson University Saturday morning and called on students to rise above political hostility and restore civility.

Sen. Collins issued two challenges to the graduates: “please stay in Maine,” a plea to bolster Maine’s dwindling workforce; and to “restore community, civility, and union in our great country.”

Sen. Collins said, “we live in a time of ever-worsening divisiveness, a time in which the bonds that have characterized and strengthened our country are not just in danger of being lost, but far too often, deliberately discarded. From government to social media, or perhaps anti-social would be the more accurate term, to the 24/7 news cycle, hyper partisanship, insult and accusation are poisoning our discourse, turning us against one another and preventing us from coming together to solve real problems.”

RELATED: Woman charged with sending Sen. Collins threatening mail pleads not guilty

RELATED: Maine’s congressional delegation speaks out after release of Mueller report

Collins said these attitudes are weakening “our sense of community” and “undermining our willingness to listen and learn from one another. This modern day tribalism divides society into ‘us versus them’ and increasingly we isolate ourselves from those who are not just like ourselves, wanting to talk only to those who mirror our political viewpoints and listen to the same media sources that we do.”

WATCH THE FULL SPEECH HERE

The class entering Husson University this past fall was the largest in the University’s history.

“This polarization is contrary to the foundation of our society that values experience and expertise with centrality of fact, humility in the face of complexity, the need for study, and a respect for differing perspectives,” said Collins. “Those who seek compromise are vilified and even threatened.”

RELATED: Sen. Collins and staff getting abusive calls and correspondence

Sen. Collins received threats surrounding her decision to confirm Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

“I am counting on you graduates to lead the way,” she said.